Paranormal Psychic Forums

Psychic paranormal community Forums for like minded individuals who wish to connect, chat and share.

Sun: From Hot to Hottest

Bringing some of the mysteries of the universe a little closer to home.

User avatar
Owlscrying
Posts: 1593
Joined: Mon Apr 03, 2017 3:21 am

Unread post Wed Nov 01, 2017 5:25 pm

Image
Image Credit: NASA/GSFC/Solar Dynamics Observatory

This sequence of images shows the Sun from its surface to its upper atmosphere all taken at about the same time on Oct. 27, 2017. The first shows the surface of the Sun in filtered white light; the other seven images were taken in different wavelengths of extreme ultraviolet light. Note that each wavelength reveals somewhat different features. They are shown in order of temperature from the first one at 6,000 degree C. surface, out to about 10 million degrees C. in the upper atmosphere. Yes, the Sun's outer atmosphere is much, much hotter than the surface. Scientists are getting closer to solving the processes that generate this phenomenon.

Source / Image Courtesy

 
Image

User avatar
Owlscrying
Posts: 1593
Joined: Mon Apr 03, 2017 3:21 am

Unread post Wed Nov 01, 2017 5:29 pm



This video of the sun based on data from NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, shows the wide range of wavelengths -- invisible to the naked eye -- that the telescope can view. SDO converts the wavelengths into an image humans can see, and the light is colorized into a rainbow of colors.

As the colors sweep around the sun in the movie, viewers should note how different the same area of the sun appears. This happens because each wavelength of light represents solar material at specific temperatures. Different wavelengths convey information about different components of the sun's surface and atmosphere, so scientists use them to paint a full picture of our constantly changing and varying star.

Yellow light of 5800 Angstroms, for example, generally emanates from material of about 10,000 degrees F (5700 degrees C), which represents the surface of the sun. Extreme ultraviolet light of 94 Angstroms, which is typically colorized in green in SDO images, comes from atoms that are about 11 million degrees F (6,300,000 degrees C) and is a good wavelength for looking at solar flares, which can reach such high temperatures.

 
Image

Post Reply

Return to “The Universe”

  • Information
  • Who is online

    Users browsing this forum: Bing [Bot] and 3 guests